Parrots inspecting hollows for nesting

We have old gum trees around the house and where branches have broken off there are now hollows that provide essential nesting habitat for parrots. Over the last few weeks we’ve noticed Blue Bonnet Parrots, Red-rumped Parrots and Galahs checking out hollows of different sizes. All three of these species are regularly seen around our property so fingers crossed some of them decide to nest here.

- Louise.

Eagles munch on fox

Michael has been busy doing pest control and unfortunately that involves shooting foxes and rabbits. But over the last few weeks he was perplexed by a little mystery and has finally solved it, with surprising results!

He’d noticed that the fox carcasses were disappearing and he couldn’t figure out what was taking them (no obvious tracks or clues). So he left the next fox carcass in a sandy area and stuck a motion sensor wildlife camera on it to capture footage of the culprit. It turned out that ravens were the first to dine, followed by two Wedge-tailed Eagles, then finally a young fox drags off the grisly remains. After five days there was nothing left, but the mystery had been solved.

- Louise.

Emus out for a family stroll

Our usual view of Emus is a brownish/grey blur, sprinting through the fields as soon as they see us coming. So it was lovely to capture this footage of an adult male taking his family for a leisurely stroll. The soft whistling peeps of the chicks and their striped patterns are beautiful.

Emus have rather unbalanced parenting roles. After the female lays the eggs she moves on and the male incubates them by sitting on the nest for nearly two months. After hatching, the chicks stay with their Dad for four to six months.

- Louise.

Here’s a group of older Emus, very inquisitive of the wildlife camera!

- Louise.